Centricity Blog

6 Months & 6 Lessons …

Posted August 30, 2010 by in Uncategorized

As I get close to my 6-month mark here at Centricity/Eaglemont, I decided to dedicate this blog to 6 of the top “lessons” I’ve learned so far. In no particular order…

1. Say “Thank You”: Seems simple enough, but don’t ever underestimate the power of saying these words. To a promoter who says, “Can’t do it,” thank them for their time (at least they took the call or answered the e-mail!). To co-worker(s) who take the time to invest in and support you, say thank you for believing in you (or step it up a notch and go for the hug)!
2. Get everything in writing: Follow up phone calls with e-mails putting into writing that was just discussed. This allows you to have a paper trail in case anything comes into question later. Being able to reference what was originally decided on has proven invaluable.
3. Do what you say you will: Tell a possible promoter you’d get back to him by the end of the day? Make time. Let a promoter know they’ll have the contract in their hands by the end of the week? Ensure you put it there. Being timely is greatly appreciated.
4. Do your homework: Trying to get one of your artists (or yourself) into a new part of the country? Be diligent when doing the research. Look into whom else has played there, where, what else is going on in the timeframe you are looking at, etc. Going to catch or show or meet a promoter, look them up. You can never be too prepared.
5. Get involved: Make an effort to learn from not only those around you in the workplace, but stay on the lookout for mentors who can help you be better at what you do and help you learn more about the industry. Make an effort to participate in meetings and lunches where you can network with others as well as get inspired to think outside the box.
6. Stay positive: It can be easy to get down yourself when a deal doesn’t come through; people aren’t getting back to you, etc. As I’ve mentioned before, the most important thing is to not give up on efforts. Keep looking for other ways to do things – stretch yourself.

What’s a big lesson you’ve learned in your career or pursuit of the industry?

About The Author: Angilee Smith

Angilee Smith works in the booking department of Eaglemont Entertainment. For more information, please visit www.eaglemontentertainment.com

  1. Erin said

    6) You must swallow your pride at times: It is easy enough to point the finger at someone else when an encounter goes wrong, but sometimes you must swallow your pride and make things right. Always stand up for what is right, but in times of confusion and mishaps, you may find it easier to just agree with those that are unhappy and do what is necessary to make sure they leave the discussion as a happy customer.

Leave a Comment...

* required